Being Transgender: What Does it Mean to Transition, Should I do it?

image description Photo Credit: Ted Eytan

Some people who come out as transgender are comfortable telling a close circle of friends. Other people choose to change their name, their pronouns (like going from being called “he” to “she”), their style of dress, and their appearance to be congruent with their gender identity. Still others choose to take hormones and have surgery to medically alter their appearance.

As you decide which, if any, steps to take, it can help to talk about these feelings with others, such as friends and family members you trust, a good mental health professional, or other transgender people. You should express yourself the way you feel most comfortable, without pressure from others.

Medical transition, the taking of hormones and having one or more surgeries, is a big step. For some, it is absolutely necessary. Most people who choose to transition medically strongly need identity and body to match. They want to be seen all the time and without question, as the gender they feel they are. To medically transition, you must first see a therapist and, in most cases, be diagnosed with “Gender Identity Disorder.”

In most states, if you are under 18, you will need a parent's permission to undertake medical transition. If you plan to pursue medical transition, it is important that your transition be supervised by a medical professional. Undertaking transition without professional medical guidance can have severe health risks.



Special Thanks:
Tommy Chesboro
Tony Aaron Fuller
Hannabah Blue
Play

Dear Auntie, I think I might be gay...When do most people know for sure?